At the beginning of the month a multi-vehicle accident occurred in Lassen County when a drunk driver hit an oncoming truck in a head-on collision. The drunk driver was in an SUV when he failed to see that a pickup truck was driving in the lane next to him going the opposite direction. The 55-year old drunk driver of the SUV swerved into the wrong lane and hit the truck head-on. The truck was being driven by a 93-year old woman.

Unable to gain control of the truck after being hit, the woman driving the truck spun across several lanes of traffic and hit an oncoming van. The van was being driven by a 74-year old Ravendale resident. Apparently the truck was carrying a 55-gallon drum of scrap metal which flew out of the truck bed and landed onto yet another vehicle being driven by a man from Susanville. The truck being with the 93-year old woman finally came to a stop when it got stuck in a large pile of rocks. Because of the angle at which the truck hit the van, the 77-year old woman driving the van was actually trapped inside for a time until police and rescuers could extract her from the vehicle.

Thankfully no one was killed in this horrific accident, but three of those who were involved were injured. This accident involving four different vehicles was caused by a single drunk driver who was unable to stay in his own lane on the road. His vision, judgment, and directional perception were all impaired due to the presence of alcohol in his system. He has now been arrested for felony driving under the influence of alcohol. He is currently being held in the Lassen County Jail.

It is thanks to the anti-drunk driving laws and sanctions put in place by the state of California that the number of drunk driving accidents has decreased each year over the last decade. In fact, the number of drunk driving accidents has decreased all over the country as many states have adopted the drunk driving laws which California has utilized for ten or more years. An example of one of these laws is that new drivers and drivers that are renewing their licenses are required to sign a written, an anti-drunk driving acknowledgment at the DMV. The acknowledgment states that if they cause a fatal automobile accident because of driving under the influence, they can and will be held accountable in a court of law for the deaths that occur. Several other states have also adopted or are in the process of adopting this written acknowledgment as well.

If you have been injured or if a loved one has been killed in a drunk driving accident in the state of California, call a personal injury attorney to discuss your rights and the rights of your deceased relative. California personal injury attorneys handle injury and wrongful death claims resultant of drunk driving accidents on regular basis and can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your loss.

Joel McLaughlin
Learn more info about Los Angeles personal injury lawyers here.

Article by Dataflurry Law Firm Marketing

Published in Auto-Lemon Law
Tuesday, 06 April 2010 04:15

Minnesota Personal Injury - Car Accidents

"What are "no-fault benefits"?

"No-fault benefits" are also often referred to as "Personal Injury Protection benefits or "PIP Benefits" for short. No Fault or PIP benefits refers to insurance coverage provided by your own automobile insurance policy regardless of who was at fault in the automobile accident. In other words, simply because the other driver was at fault does not mean that your insurance will not pay you for your injuries. In fact, the opposite is true. No fault benefits may include compensation for wage loss, medical expenses, mileage and replacement vehicle. Under Minnesota law, all motor vehicle owners must have no-fault coverage as part of their automobile insurance coverage. No Fault insurances is also called first-party coverage. This means that if you are injured in a car accident, it is your insurance that pays the no fault compensation rather than the insurance of the party at fault or even the insurance of the vehicle in which you were riding. Essentially, no fault coverage applies to the insured person, not the vehicle.

How much coverage is necessary? Minnesota requires automobile owners to carry a minimum no-fault policy that pays $20,000 for medical coverage for any individual and $20,000 for all other losses including any income loss, replacement services and other economic losses. The requirement for insurance is set out in Minnesota Statutes

Published in Accident Law
Tuesday, 06 April 2010 04:15

Accident Claim Solicitors

Published in Accident Law
Sunday, 18 April 2010 06:16

Statutes of Limitations

A “statute of limitation” is a time frame that defines the length of time an individual has to file a claim. The time limit begins when an injury occurs, or is discovered, and concludes on the latest date the injured person can file suit. These time limits vary from state to state, and depend on the type of claim to be filed. The time frame of the statute of limitations usually begins when the injury or wrongful act occurs. However, some states may allow a claim to proceed if the wrongdoing or injury was not discovered until a later date. The time frame would then begin on the date of discovery.

Published in General
Tuesday, 06 April 2010 06:17

Accident Claim Solicitors

Published in Other Legal Areas
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